SERVICES

Visa Appeals

The Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT)

The Tribunal provides an independent assessment of administrative decisions made under Commonwealth law. It reviews decisions made by ministers, departments and agencies of the Australian Government and, in some cases, decisions made by state and non-state government agencies, as well as decisions made in accordance with Norfolk Island laws.

Along with my migration practice, I represent my clients at the AAT. The tribunal may consider applications for review of decisions on visa and migration matters, as well as on matters of citizenship.

The statistics of successful cases, where I represent the interests of the clients as a senior migration agent of Yulia Moiseeva & Associates is 98%.

If you have any questions regarding AAT application, please book a consultation:

The Appeals Tribunal was established under the Administrative Courts of Appeal Act and began operations on 1 July 1976. Effective July 1, 2015, the Migration Tribunal, Refugee Tribunal and Social Security Appeals Tribunal have been merged with the AAT.

The AAT is composed of the President and other members appointed as Deputy Presidents, Senior Members or Members who have experience in areas such as accounting, aviation, disability, engineering, law, medicine, migration, military affairs, government, science and social Security. They consider additional information that may not have been available before the initial decision was made and often hold hearings to verify evidence.

Among other issues, the Tribunal may review cases related to migration and refugee visas, visa decisions and Australian citizenship. All decisions are considered “on the merits”, taking into account and within the framework of the applicable legislation, that is, all facts, arguments and conclusions are considered in a new way, where new decision is made.

Often clients come to me for revision of refusal decisions, who made a mistake in the application or did not provide enough evidence required for a positive decision.

Appeals to the Tribunal may also involve a review of decisions due to more serious reasons, such as failure to meet health criteria or a criminal record.

The decisions of the Tribunal are of the following nature:

  • confirm the decision
  • change the decision
  • postpone the decision and replace with a new one, or
  • remit the decision for reconsideration.

 

If a party believes that the AAT’s decision is incorrect, you can appeal the decision to a higher court. Parties can appeal to either the Federal Court or the Federal District Court, depending on the type of decision appealed.

I know that many of you made a lot of effort to get to this country, and in case of any refusal decision, I recommend that you seek help from professionals who will collect a complete evidence base and assist you to achieve Australian happiness!